Transactions in SQL Server are very useful, however I have come across that not many people use them. Not sure why this could be, so thought I would share how transactions work and the different modes.

A transaction is a single unit of work. If a transaction is successful, all of the data modifications made during the transaction are committed and become a permanent part of the database. If a transaction encounters errors and must be canceled or rolled back, then all of the data modifications are erased.

SQL Server operates in the following transaction modes:
Autocommit transactions
Each individual statement is a transaction.

Explicit transactions
Each transaction is explicitly started with the BEGIN TRANSACTION statement and explicitly ended with a COMMIT or ROLLBACK statement.

Implicit transactions
A new transaction is implicitly started when the prior transaction completes, but each transaction is explicitly completed with a COMMIT or ROLLBACK statement.

Batch-scoped transactions
Applicable only to multiple active result sets (MARS), a Transact-SQL explicit or implicit transaction that starts under a MARS session becomes a batch-scoped transaction. A batch-scoped transaction that is not committed or rolled back when a batch completes is automatically rolled back by SQL Server.

From my experience Explicit transactions are the most commonly used out of all the different modes.

Distributed Transactions:
You can use Distributed transactions which specifies the start of a SQL distributed transaction managed by Microsoft Distributed Transaction Coordinator (MS DTC). This is only applicable to SQL Server and no Azure. Transaction-level snapshot isolation does not support distributed transactions.

Arguments:
transaction_name
Is a user-defined transaction name used to track the distributed transaction within MS DTC utilities. transaction_name must conform to the rules for identifiers and must be <= 32 characters.

@tran_name_variable
Is the name of a user-defined variable containing a transaction name used to track the distributed transaction within MS DTC utilities. The variable must be declared with a char, varchar, nchar, or nvarchar data type.

The instance of the SQL Server Database Engine executing the BEGIN DISTRIBUTED TRANSACTION statement is the transaction originator and controls the completion of the transaction. When a subsequent COMMIT TRANSACTION or ROLLBACK TRANSACTION statement is issued for the session, the controlling instance requests that MS DTC manage the completion of the distributed transaction across all of the instances involved.

For example, if BEGIN DISTRIBUTED TRANSACTION is issued on ServerA, the session calls a stored procedure on ServerB and another stored procedure on ServerC. The stored procedure on ServerC executes a distributed query against ServerD, and then all four computers are involved in the distributed transaction. The instance of the Database Engine on ServerA is the originating controlling instance for the transaction.

USE AdventureWorks2012;  
GO  
BEGIN DISTRIBUTED TRANSACTION;  
-- Delete candidate from local instance.  
DELETE AdventureWorks2012.HumanResources.JobCandidate  
    WHERE JobCandidateID = 13;  
-- Delete candidate from remote instance.  
DELETE RemoteServer.AdventureWorks2012.HumanResources.JobCandidate  
    WHERE JobCandidateID = 13;  
COMMIT TRANSACTION;  
GO  

Begin Transaction
Marks the starting point of an explicit, local transaction. Explicit transactions start with the BEGIN TRANSACTION statement and end with the COMMIT or ROLLBACK statement. BEGIN TRANSACTION increments @@TRANCOUNT by 1.

BEGIN TRANSACTION represents a point at which the data referenced by a connection is logically and physically consistent. If errors are encountered, all data modifications made after the BEGIN TRANSACTION can be rolled back to return the data to this known state of consistency. Each transaction lasts until either it completes without errors and COMMIT TRANSACTION is issued to make the modifications a permanent part of the database, or errors are encountered and all modifications are erased with a ROLLBACK TRANSACTION statement.

Although BEGIN TRANSACTION starts a local transaction, it is not recorded in the transaction log until the application subsequently performs an action that must be recorded in the log, such as executing an INSERT, UPDATE, or DELETE statement.

Naming multiple transactions in a series of nested transactions with a transaction name has little effect on the transaction. Only the first (outermost) transaction name is registered with the system. A rollback to any other name (other than a valid save point name) generates an error. None of the statements executed before the rollback is, in fact, rolled back at the time this error occurs. The statements are rolled back only when the outer transaction is rolled back.

BEGIN TRY
	BEGIN TRANSACTION
	
	DELETE	FROM HumanResources.JobCandidate
	WHERE	JobCandidateID = 13
	
	COMMIT
	
END TRY
BEGIN CATCH
	ROLLBACK
	
END CATCH

Hope this helps you in future when using transactions. If you are doing INSERTS, UPDATES and DELETES it is advisable that you use a transaction.

One thought on “SQL Transactions

  1. Pingback: Understanding Transactions In SQL Server – Curated SQL

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